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Every tenth species in Finland threatened

Long-term progress:
10.5% of the species well enough known to facilitate an assessment of their threat status are classified as threatened.
Short-term progress:
The number of threatened species increased by 742 compared to the 2000 assessment.
Progress in relation to targets:
Halting the growth in the number of threatened species was not achieved by 2010. Even the new target of halting biodiversity loss in Finland by 2020 seems difficult to attain.

Finnish species by IUCN classification

Finnish species by IUCN classification
Sources: Rassi P., Hyvärinen E., Juslén A. & Mannerkoski I. (eds.): The 2010 Red List of Finnish Species. 2010.

2,247 threatened species

Approximately one tenth of species, 2,247 in all, were classified as threatened on the 2010 Red List of Finnish Species.

More than one third of these are forest species that are suffering from such things as decreasing numbers of old trees and forest fires, and lack of decaying wood. Almost one half of threatened forest species inhabit herb-rich forests, and one third old forests. 9% of Finland's forests are protected in various ways, but protected areas are unevenly distributed both geographically and by forest type. In Northern Finland (Kainuu, North Ostrobothnia, Lapland), 15.8% of forests are strictly protected, but the figure in Southern Finland is only 2.3%.

Various environments influenced by man also make important habitats. Almost one quarter of threatened species require meadows, wooded pastures or other semi-natural habitat. These habitats become easily overgrown with bushes and trees as the numbers of grazing animals decrease.

Overgrowth threatens shorelines as well. Reed and Japanese rose (Rosa rugosa) invade areas of low vegetation and open patches on which a number of species depend.

Mines and extraction of rock for building purposes threaten species living in rock outcrops, particularly lichens and mosses. Even those outcrops that house the largest array of species are not necessarily protected because there is no specific protection programme for rock outcrops.

Enough is known about just under one half of the approximately 45,000 species in Finland to facilitate an assessment of their threat status. Although the other half remain unassessed, the status of species in Finland is exceptionally well known in comparison to other countries.

Sources:

  • Rassi P., Hyvärinen E., Juslén A. & Mannerkoski I. (eds.): The 2010 Red List of Finnish Species. 2010.
  • Finnish Environment Institute. 2013.

 

Published 2015-06-23 at 13:24, updated 2016-07-21 at 18:20